Latest News from Everycare

Shortages of care staff – causing major issues for hospitals

Shortages of care staff, who support older or disabled people in the community, are causing major problems for hospitals, the BBC has learned.

NHS chief executives say rising numbers of patients are stuck in hospitals in England due to a lack of care staff.

The situation is “dire”, according to NHS Providers, which represents health service trusts.

The government says extra funding and a regular recruitment drive will help boost the care workforce.

Care companies are facing acute problems in recruiting and retaining staff, according to a report which suggests there are now more unfilled care jobs than before the pandemic.

Shortages of care staff, who support older or disabled people in the community, are causing major problems for hospitals, the BBC has learned.

NHS chief executives say rising numbers of patients are stuck in hospitals in England due to a lack of care staff.

The situation is “dire”, according to NHS Providers, which represents health service trusts.

The government says extra funding and a regular recruitment drive will help boost the care workforce.

Care companies are facing acute problems in recruiting and retaining staff, according to a report which suggests there are now more unfilled care jobs than before the pandemic.

Jobs unfilled

The annual Skills for Care workforce report is based on data provided by a representative sample of employers of England’s 1.54 million care workers.

The researchers calculate that employers were failing to fill 8% of posts before the pandemic.

Figures obtained since suggest this had fallen to below 6% by June 2020 – but by August this year the trend had reversed with 8.2% of care sector roles unfilled.

This amounts to more than 100,000 posts with no-one to fill them, says Skills for Care.

To read the full story visit the BBC News website.

Social care: What are the changes to the England, Scotland and Wales’ system and how much will people have to pay?

National Insurance will be increased to pay for care, with new asset thresholds determining how much people pay and a cap on how much people will have to spend during their lifetimes.

Boris Johnson has announced a major shake-up of social care funding in England.

hike in National Insurance will pay for a pledge made when Mr Johnson became prime minister in 2019 to “fix the broken care system”. However, this means he will be breaking his promise to not raise taxes, which has angered Tory backbenchers. Mr Johnson said he was unable to keep that promise due to the COVID pandemic.

What are the changes to social care?

Dementia not Covid-19 was the greatest cause of death for women in 2020

Home care services Everycare UK

Dementia not Covid-19 was the greatest cause of death for women in 2020 – killing 45,922 women in England and Wales, official figures reveal.

Some 125 women are dying of dementia every day – that’s five women an hour, according to the Office for National Statistics.

In men, Covid caused the most deaths for men in England and Wales, followed by heart disease, after which dementia and Alzheimer’s disease came third by claiming the lives of over 24,000 men.

In the UK, dementia affects 850,000 people and there is no cure.

The number of people with dementia is set to triple in three decades, with 152 million estimated to be affected globally by 2050, according to research by the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The research was presented at the 2021 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Colorado at the end of July.

Dementia charities are calling for global action to fund research into a cure for dementia.

Hilary Evans, chief executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK has called dementia “our greatest long-term medical challenge”.

“With the number of people with dementia set to triple, we need to see concerted global action now.

“To safeguard progress and improve outcomes around the world, it’s vital our government invests to maintain the UK as a global hub for dementia research to safeguard research progress and improve outcomes around the world.”

This story was provided by homecare.co.uk

 

Nearly 9 million older people feel less confident attending hospital appointments now than before the pandemic

With fifty four per cent of over 60s feeling less confident attending a hospital appointment and almost six million feeling less confident going to a GP surgery than before the pandemic, Age UK worries how many people can “bounce back” from Covid-19.

Age UK says the impact of the pandemic on the health and wellbeing of some older people in early 2021 is so demonstrably severe it has left “deep physical and emotional scars” on the older population. The adverse effect may prove long lasting in many cases, or even irreversible, with big implications for the NHS and social care in the months and years to come.

Age UK who carried out the research during January and February 2021 also found nearly four and a half million people over 60 said they couldn’t walk as far with around four million people reported they were living in more physical pain.

For the full story visit the homecare.co.uk website