Latest News from Everycare

Shortages of care staff – causing major issues for hospitals

Shortages of care staff, who support older or disabled people in the community, are causing major problems for hospitals, the BBC has learned.

NHS chief executives say rising numbers of patients are stuck in hospitals in England due to a lack of care staff.

The situation is “dire”, according to NHS Providers, which represents health service trusts.

The government says extra funding and a regular recruitment drive will help boost the care workforce.

Care companies are facing acute problems in recruiting and retaining staff, according to a report which suggests there are now more unfilled care jobs than before the pandemic.

Shortages of care staff, who support older or disabled people in the community, are causing major problems for hospitals, the BBC has learned.

NHS chief executives say rising numbers of patients are stuck in hospitals in England due to a lack of care staff.

The situation is “dire”, according to NHS Providers, which represents health service trusts.

The government says extra funding and a regular recruitment drive will help boost the care workforce.

Care companies are facing acute problems in recruiting and retaining staff, according to a report which suggests there are now more unfilled care jobs than before the pandemic.

Jobs unfilled

The annual Skills for Care workforce report is based on data provided by a representative sample of employers of England’s 1.54 million care workers.

The researchers calculate that employers were failing to fill 8% of posts before the pandemic.

Figures obtained since suggest this had fallen to below 6% by June 2020 – but by August this year the trend had reversed with 8.2% of care sector roles unfilled.

This amounts to more than 100,000 posts with no-one to fill them, says Skills for Care.

To read the full story visit the BBC News website.

High Demand for Live in Care

As restrictions around the pandemic begin to ease more people are looking at returning to home from hospital settings rather than go into long term residential care.

The industry reports it’s busiest ever 6 months of enquiries for the provision of live in care while care providers struggle with recruitment, in part caused by Brexit, which has left many live in carers from Eastern Europe unable to return to the UK to work.

Everycare Eastbourne has now launched a service to run alongside it’s live in care service where clients can receive their care from staff on a series of shifts throughout the day and night. This provides the client with regular carers during the hours that they most need them without being tied to the hourly visits of normal domiciliary care.

Local Eastbourne homecare workers are celebrated at party 

Local homecare company, Everycare Eastbourne honoured their homecarers and recognised their amazing work on 22nd September, by taking part in the first ever ‘Celebrating Homecare’ day, organised by the Homecare Association and The Care Workers’ Charity (CWC).  

The company hosted an event, where their team were welcomed to enjoy homemade cakes and refreshments. 

‘Celebrating Homecare’ has been launched to celebrate and recognise the amazing work that homecarers provide.  Every day of the year, homecare workers support people to live safely and well at home, enabling people to flourish within our communities.  

The theme for this year’s inaugural event was ‘made with care’, celebrating the fantastic relationships that exist between the people who give and receive care, and highlight the many activities they enjoy together. Whether this is crafting, baking, completing a jigsaw or even filming a TikTok, careworkers and the people they support were encouraged to and celebrate something they have made or shared together. 

Everycare Eastbourne employs around 50 careworkers who support their clients in their own homes, providing taylor made packages including personal care, companionship, assisting with shopping all the way through to 24 Live in care. Throughout a difficult period, they have served an important role as key workers, providing vital support to clients living across Eastbourne.   

Jane Townson, CEO of the Homecare Association commented: “Homecare workers have been a lifeline for many people throughout the past 18 months, showing real selflessness and resilience in providing invaluable support to people in their own homes in incredibly challenging times.  But the work they do is always important – not just throughout the pandemic. Homecare services benefit all of us: people who receive and give services, their families, health services and our wider communities.  Their roles deserve to be celebrated now, and increasingly into the future.” 

Speaking about the celebration, Karolina Gerlich, CEO of the CWC said: “It’s right and proper every so often to take a step back from the day to day and look at what you have achieved.  Careworkers do such amazing work, bringing companionship, care and comfort to so many people.  It’s wonderful to have the opportunity to celebrate what they do!” 

Owner of Everycare Eastbourne, Angela Fuller comments: “it’s because our carers care so much that their personal resources have been pushed to the limits, but they have given their all, we are so grateful.  We couldn’t have asked for more” 

To find out more about Everycare Eastbourne, and the homecare services they provide across East Sussex, please call 01323 430762.

Dementia not Covid-19 was the greatest cause of death for women in 2020

Home care services Everycare UK

Dementia not Covid-19 was the greatest cause of death for women in 2020 – killing 45,922 women in England and Wales, official figures reveal.

Some 125 women are dying of dementia every day – that’s five women an hour, according to the Office for National Statistics.

In men, Covid caused the most deaths for men in England and Wales, followed by heart disease, after which dementia and Alzheimer’s disease came third by claiming the lives of over 24,000 men.

In the UK, dementia affects 850,000 people and there is no cure.

The number of people with dementia is set to triple in three decades, with 152 million estimated to be affected globally by 2050, according to research by the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The research was presented at the 2021 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Colorado at the end of July.

Dementia charities are calling for global action to fund research into a cure for dementia.

Hilary Evans, chief executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK has called dementia “our greatest long-term medical challenge”.

“With the number of people with dementia set to triple, we need to see concerted global action now.

“To safeguard progress and improve outcomes around the world, it’s vital our government invests to maintain the UK as a global hub for dementia research to safeguard research progress and improve outcomes around the world.”

This story was provided by homecare.co.uk