Latest News from Everycare

Clap for Carers – Thank you

carers applauseAt 20:00 BST on Thursday, households across the UK stood on their doorsteps and balconies and applauded the efforts of the NHS and care workers in treating those affected by Covid-19.

The initiative was devised by Annemarie Plas, from Brixton, south-west London, who was inspired by same event happening in her home country of the Netherlands, and in many other countries.

Annemarie posted details of the event on her social media channels, and enthusiasm for taking part quickly spread across the UK.

“I hope that it creates a positive boost for those on the frontline,” she said.

“But also [when] you hear your neighbours applauding you know that we are together in this, because we are currently all in our houses.”

For the full story visit the BBC website.

Wales considers tax rises to pay for growing care costs

Tax rises to cover the cost of caring for elderly and disabled people are being considered by the Welsh Government. The money raised could be spent on abolishing care fees or on a pay rise for care workers. A consultation on possible reforms to social care is due to start this summer.

Health Minister Vaughan Gething is set to call for “honesty” and a “grown-up debate” about increasing care costs. But the idea of raising income tax is likely to prove contentious in the run-up to the Welsh elections next year. Social care is under pressure across the UK from a squeeze on funding, an ageing population and high staff turnover. The state spends about £1.2bn on adult social care every year in Wales.

But in a statement to AMs on Tuesday Mr Gething will say the cost is predicted to grow between £30m and £300m by 2023. If the government wants “to seriously improve the quality and the reach of care, then it will require more funding”, he told BBC Wales.

For more on this story visit the BBC Wales website

Allied Healthcare at risk of collapse!

Allied Healthcare at risk of collapse leaving thousands of elderly people on alert.

Allied Healthcare could cease to operate at the end of the month, the Care Quality Commission has said and there is a ‘credible risk’ services could be disrupted.

Thousands of elderly people were put on alert yesterday amid warnings one of the country’s leading care firms is at risk of collapse.

The Care Quality Commission sounded the alarm after saying Allied Healthcare could cease to operate at the end of this month.

It said there was a “credible risk” that services could be “disrupted” if the company collapsed. Allied Heathcare provides home care – help with washing, feeding and dressing – for 9,300 people in 84 councils across England. The company, which has been struggling with debts, employs 8,000 people. Councils have a duty by law to continue to provide care if a private firm goes bust.

For more on this story visit the Daily Mirror Website.

“Talking about Dying” report encourages conversations about future care choices

Everycare home care and live in care services can enable people to stay at home during the most challenging period of their lives.
Doctors are being encouraged to discuss people’s end of life choices much earlier with them and part of this discussion will involve where and how people spend their final days.

Doctors need to get better at having difficult conversations with dying patients and not just in their final days, according to a report from the Royal College of Physicians.

It says doctors should talk to people who could die within 12 months, who may be frail or terminally ill, and give them choices over their future care. But the report says that rarely happens and doctors should be more proactive.It recommends involving family, friends and carers in the conversation too.

The report, Talking about dying, gathered the views of patients, trainees and doctors on how to begin conversations about the end of someone’s life. To read more about this story visit the BBC website.

To find out more about Everycare home care and live in care services and how they can help you stay at home.