Latest News from Everycare

The NHS should spend cash on care at home rather than on hospital beds

Cutting hospital beds and using the money for care at home could mean better treatment for patients, according to NHS England’s chief nursing officer.

Prof Jane Cummings states that freeing up the money put into “old and expensive buildings” is one way the health service can improve.

Staying in hospital too long can often make patients more ill, she claims.

The Patients’ Association said social care and the NHS needed to integrate.

Prof Cummings said “outdated models of care” needed to change.

Personalised care

The article is in response to a review set up by the NHS which split England into 44 areas, ordering local managers and councils to come up with sustainability and transformation plans to improve efficiency.

Describing an NHS organisation in Devon, Prof Cummings said: “[It] wants to invest in home-based care, but it struggles because resources are currently tied up in hospital beds.” To read more visit the BBC website

4 out of 5 people no longer have state funded care

As the government struggles with the social care budget the true scale of the problem is highlighted by the Local Government Association.

As part of their review of possible alternative ways to pay for the care of our ageing population a recent review indicated that ‘The numbers of elderly people going without care, paying for it themselves or relying on family and friends currently outstrip those getting council help by four to one.’

For further details of the governments funding plans click on the link

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-38319342

Dementia causes strain on care system

Dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, has overtaken heart disease as the leading cause of death in England and Wales, latest figures reveal.

Last year, more than 61,000 people died of dementia – 11.6% of all recorded deaths.

The Office for National Statistics says the change is largely due to an ageing population.

People are living for longer and deaths from some other causes, including heart disease, have gone down.

Also, doctors have got better at diagnosing dementia and the condition is now given more weight on death certificates.

For decades, numerous attempts to find a drug that might slow the progress of the disease have failed. Without an effective drug treatment, doctors and scientists have pragmatically focused on treating people’s symptoms.

Recently, a new trial drug, aducanumab, has emerged that offers strong hope, particularly for those with mild symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

Early trials show the drug works by reducing the build-up of amyloid, another protein implicated in the disease, which clumps together in plaques years before the tau forms tangles.

For more information on this story visit the BBC Website

Councils – not paying fair price for care!

Nine out of 10 councils in the UK are failing to pay realistic prices to support older and disabled people in their own homes, the industry says.

The UK Home Care Association calculated the minimum price councils should be paying was £16.70 per hour, but the average was over £2 less.

Councils said they had been left with little choice given the squeeze on their finances by the government.

But the UKHCA said the situation was threatening the future of the market.

It warned agencies were struggling to recruit staff and maintain quality, noting growing numbers of organisations were handing back contracts to councils. For more information on this story visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-37756433