Au pairs for the elderly? Live in care, the new elderly care solution?

Live in carers for the elderly, although still only catering for a tiny proportion of the older population are now becoming an increasingly mainstream choice.

But the choice between finding a care home for relatives unable to manage on their own and leaving them to struggle on in their home could become a thing of the past amid surging demand for live-in “companion carers”.

Once a virtually unheard-of option, a small network of companies providing full-time live-in carers, say they are experiencing a rise in demand in the wake of waves of scandals about standards in care homes and traditional homecare agencies as well as headlines over soaring fees. According to the Live-in Care Hub, a network of 14 small and medium sized companies offering live-in care set up two years ago to promote the sector at present only around 10,000 families currently make use of it although all have reported growing interest. By comparison, around 290,000 older people in England and Wales live in care homes, according to the last census.

To read more about why live in carers are becoming more sought after – click here.

The NHS should spend cash on care at home rather than on hospital beds

Cutting hospital beds and using the money for care at home could mean better treatment for patients, according to NHS England’s chief nursing officer.

Prof Jane Cummings states that freeing up the money put into “old and expensive buildings” is one way the health service can improve.

Staying in hospital too long can often make patients more ill, she claims.

The Patients’ Association said social care and the NHS needed to integrate.

Prof Cummings said “outdated models of care” needed to change.

Personalised care

The article is in response to a review set up by the NHS which split England into 44 areas, ordering local managers and councils to come up with sustainability and transformation plans to improve efficiency.

Describing an NHS organisation in Devon, Prof Cummings said: “[It] wants to invest in home-based care, but it struggles because resources are currently tied up in hospital beds.” To read more visit the BBC website