Latest News from Everycare

Joseph Ndori wins a Dignity in Care Award

Joseph Ndori Everycare Oxford wins home care awardEverycare Oxford is delighted to be able to announce that carer and director Joseph Ndori was nominated  and won an award at the Dignity in Care Awards 2017.

Joseph was nominated by the husband of a client he cares for.

“I have been caring for my wife who developed dementia 5 years ago. My wife is sometimes aggressive but Joseph has such a calming effect on her. He never gets upset with her and my wife responds to his gentle manner. My wife would be back in a home otherwise. He is so gentle with her. I will always be in debt giving me confidence that we can care for her at home.

Being able to care for my wife for the rest of my days is my goal and it will be Joseph that I have to thank for it. When Joseph calls it is like a breath of fresh air.”

The son of the client added “Joseph is very caring and calm. Previous carers did not have the right approach when dealing with my mother …my mother has taken to him.”

The NHS should spend cash on care at home rather than on hospital beds

Cutting hospital beds and using the money for care at home could mean better treatment for patients, according to NHS England’s chief nursing officer.

Prof Jane Cummings states that freeing up the money put into “old and expensive buildings” is one way the health service can improve.

Staying in hospital too long can often make patients more ill, she claims.

The Patients’ Association said social care and the NHS needed to integrate.

Prof Cummings said “outdated models of care” needed to change.

Personalised care

The article is in response to a review set up by the NHS which split England into 44 areas, ordering local managers and councils to come up with sustainability and transformation plans to improve efficiency.

Describing an NHS organisation in Devon, Prof Cummings said: “[It] wants to invest in home-based care, but it struggles because resources are currently tied up in hospital beds.” To read more visit the BBC website

Everycare Eastbourne celebrate 20 years of home care

Everycare are Eastbourne’s longest established privately owned care and nursing agency and on September 15th this year they celebrateEverycare Eastbourne anniversary their 20th anniversary.

Angela Fuller, Everycare’s proprietor who was born and grew up in Eastbourne said ‘There are lots of care companies around and we have seen so many come and go over the years so it’s great that we’re able to celebrate 20 years of being in the business in Eastbourne’

‘We started in 1997 with just two of us in the office with no staff or clients. Now we have a team of 10 in the office, including Louise who started with us 20 years ago, along with 130 care staff and well over 100 clients’

‘So much has changed over those 20 years. Mobile phones were still in their infancy now they are the lifeblood of the industry with more and more technology available to help with rotas and communication’

Everycare have provided home care and nursing services since they opened in 1997 and added a 24 hour live in care service 4 years ago due to people with more complex needs wanting to stay in their own homes rather than go into residential care. With continued pressure on the care industry and NHS this is a service that is showing significant growth.

Angela added ‘We’d really like to say a huge thank you to all our staff, past and present, for all their hard work over the last 20 years. We look forward to continue providing this valuable service to the people of Eastbourne, hopefully for another 20 years!’

Care industry receives a wake up call

With the NHS forecasting a 40,000 staffing shortfall as applications from nurses in the EU drops by 96%, care providers who frequently employ EU nationals, are similarly facing a staffing crises.

The NMC said the introduction of English language testing for EU nurses is also likely to have played a role.

It comes as the NHS is already struggling with nurse vacancies and, without this supply line, shortages could get worse.

In May, research by the Royal College of Nursing found one in nine posts in England was vacant.

The union said it meant the NHS was 40,000 nurses short of what was needed.

The impact on the home care sector is yet again unknown but is a major concern to companies operating in the sector who rely on EU nationals to care for clients.

For more information on this story visit the BBC website.