Latest News from Everycare

Government’s extra £150m for social care is ‘sticking plaster over gaping wound’

The Government has announced an extra £150m for social care which ‘will be allocated according to relative needs’.

Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, Sajid Javid

However social care chiefs have said it “is not going to make a great deal of difference” and have criticised the extra injection of cash as a “sticking plaster over a gaping wound”.

Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, Sajid Javid, has made the extra money available following publication of the Local Government Finance Settlement for 2018 to 2019.

In a statement to Parliament, he said: “I recognise the need to prioritise spending on social care services that councils provide to our elderly and vulnerable citizens. This is why we announced an additional £2 billion at Spring Budget 2017 for adult social care over the three years from 2017-18. This year we have seen how this money has enabled councils to increase provider fees, provide for more care packages and reduce delayed transfer of care.

“And, having listening to representations since the provisional settlement, I am today announcing a further £150 million in 2018-19 for an Adult Social Care Support Grant. This will be taken from anticipated underspend in existing departmental budgets, and will not affect existing revenue commitments made to local government. This will be allocated according to relative needs and we will expect to see councils use it to build on their progress so far in supporting sustainable local care markets.”

Margaret Willcox, president of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS), called all money “welcome” and said: “We will make the most of what we get, but considering councils need more than £2bn just to stand still in 2018-19, this is not going to make a great deal of difference.

To see the full story visit Homecare.co.uk

NHS dementia patients – stranded in hospital

More than 1,400 NHS dementia patients well enough to go home at Christmas will be stranded in hospital, warns the Alzheimers’s Society.

Lack of social care funding ‘turning wards into waiting rooms’ as figures shows dementia patients are delayed up to 10 times longer than hospital patients without the condition

More than 1,400 people with dementia who are well enough to go home will be stranded in hospital on Christmas Day, a charity has warned.

The Alzheimer’s Society said the lack of social care funding was “turning wards into waiting rooms” as an investigation they carried out revealed dementia patients were delayed up to 10 times longer than patients without the condition.

To read more  visit the Independent news website

Quality care matters

In the summer a bold statement of intent was published setting out a single view of high quality adult social care. The creation of commissioners, providers, staff, national bodies and people who use services, their families and carers, it was a joint commitment to making a real difference for service users, carers, families and everyone working in the sector. It was called Quality Matters.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) was one of its many contributors.  Professor Gillian Leng, Deputy Chief Executive and Director of Health and Social Care at NICE believes that the delivery of effective and efficient care is dependent upon health and social care services working more closely together. Check out her views on how the system needs to change – Click here

Exercise and keeping active – better than resting for the elderly!

Instead of resting, older people should be exercising and keeping physically active, according to doctors.

A report in the British Medical Journal has called for a change in the current thinking that exercise is only for the young.

Older people need to take responsibility for their health and cut down the need for social care by keeping fit, say doctors.

Scarlett McNally, an orthopaedic surgeon and lead author of the report, said: “Social care can be preventable because the risk of disease, disability, dementia and frailty can be reduced.

“We need individuals to understand how to get active every day and to help their friends and family to be active. We need national and local organisations to build activity and active travel into our environments and to demand improvements. The improvements are quick.”

For more information on this story – click here